Education Vital Signs: After School & Summer Programs

Time in school matters – and so does the time students spend outside of school. Studies show that longer school days can provide enrichment activities and help students who are behind begin to catch up with their peers. Sometimes, these extended hours are provided by the school district; other times, they are offered by nonprofits and other concerned groups. Such programs are an important service for many “latchkey” children -- students whose parents or guardians are working when they get out of school. And they are critically important in poor urban areas, where the streets may not be safe and high-risk students may be enticed to join gangs. The nonprofit Afterschool Alliance has long argued that after school programs make financial and public policy sense as well. For some children, they could tip the balance favorably between life on the streets (or in jail) and a productive future.

School Superintendent POV: A Study on Effective Use of Students’ Out-of-School Time

http://www.discoverchampions.com/pdf/Champions_NAA%20Survey_Results_10.11.11.pdf

A large majority of the superintendents participating in a recent survey about the benefits of out-of-school programs believe they are important (82 percent), can help improve kids’ social interaction skills (92 percent) and academic performance (93 percent), and can be useful in improving children’s math (95 percent) and reading skills (94 percent). Eighty-four percent of the superintendents surveyed for School Superintendent POV: A Study on Effective Use of Students’ Out-of-School Time say before- and afterschool programs offer their teachers additional opportunities to interact and bond with students.

October 2011




Making Summer Count

http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monographs/2011/RAND_MG1120.pdf

Making Summer Count, a report by the RAND Corp., shows that summer programs effectively prevent the “summer slide” and that summer program participants do better in school. The authors say that cost is the usual barrier to implementing summer programs, and that these programs are most effective when district leaders plan early and invest in highly qualified staff, consider partnerships, think creatively about funding sources, and apply district best practices to their summer programs.

June 2011


Making Summer Count

http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monographs/2011/RAND_MG1120.pdf

Making Summer Count, a report by the RAND Corp., shows that summer programs effectively prevent the “summer slide” and that summer program participants do better in school. The authors say that cost is the usual barrier to implementing summer programs, and that these programs are most effective when district leaders plan early and invest in highly qualified staff, consider partnerships, think creatively about funding sources, and apply district best practices to their summer programs.

June 2011


America After 3PM, Special Report on Summer
http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/documents/Special_Report_on_Summer_052510.pdf
Many years of research indicates that more than half of the achievement gap between ninth-grade lower- and higher-income youth results from summer learning loss. A new report, America After 3PM, Special Report on Summer, predicts that only 25 percent of U.S. children will attend summer learning programs this year. Summer learning loss disproportionately affects low-income youth and is part of the reason they are less likely to graduate high school and enter college, the report says.
May 2010

After-School Grows Up: Helping Teens Prepare for the Future
http://www.forumfyi.org/files/OSTPC14.pdf
Publicly funded after-school programs for high school students are one of the newest strategies in efforts to help prepare students for postsecondary education or the work-force. A publication from The Forum for Youth Investment provides a cross-country tour of innovative after-school programs for teens.
April 2009

America After 3PM
http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/AA3PM.cfm
America After 3PM, a new study conducted for the Afterschool Alliance, finds that more than a quarter of Pennsylvania’s schoolchildren are on their own in the afternoons, and another 15 percent are in the care of their siblings. Participation in after-school programs remains low -- just 9 percent -- even though statewide demand and support for the programs has increased over the last five years.
2009

Uncertain Times 2009
http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/UncertainTimes2009.cfm
Ninety-five percent of respondents in a recent survey of after-school program leaders say the recession is affecting their communities, and worry about future funding for their programs. Respondents say that, just when children need their programs most, they are being forced to increase program fees and reduce staffing and services.
2009

2008 Election Eve/ Election Day Poll on Voters’ Attitudes on Afterschool
What Matters, What Works: Advancing Achievement After School
http://irvine.org/publications/publications-by-topic/youth#youth6
After-school programs can improve participants’ literacy by providing intensive lessons several times a week and establishing strong bonds between instructors and participants, according to What Matters, What Works: Advancing Achievement After School, a study by the New York City-based Public/Private Ventures, a public policy research organization.
February 2008

Poll: Voters think aftershool programs are important
http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/2008_election_poll_summary-final.pdf
A new poll taken on Election eve and Election night shows that nearly nine in 10 voters (89 percent) say that, given the dangers young people face today, afterschool programs are important. Four in five voters (83 percent) agree there should be some type of organized activity or safe place for children and teens to go after school every day that provides opportunities for them to learn – and 76 percent want the new Congress and their newly elected state and local officials to increase funding for afterschool programs.
November 2008

Outcome Evaluation: A Guide for Out-Of-School Time Practitioners
http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_Trends-2008_01_07_OutcomeEvaluation.pdf
Outcome evaluations should be used regularly to evaluate the success of after-school programs, according to Child Trends, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that researches child and youth issues. The report, Outcome Evaluation: A Guide for Out-Of-School Time Practitioners, says the evaluations should be unique and take into account how after-school programs change.
January 2008

Quality Time After School: What Instructors Can Do to Enhance Learning
http://www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/213_publication.pdf
Effective group management is crucial to building strong after-school programs that children want to attend, suggests Quality Time After School: What Instructors Can Do to Enhance Learning available from Public/Private Ventures. Good group management includes setting reasonable ground rules, providing encouragement and praise, reinforcing expectations consistently, and handling broken ground rules in a firm but not harsh way.
April 2007